News

West Jefferson Observes Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month

West Jefferson Medical Center (WJMC) is proudly raising awareness of Atrial Fibrillation during September ‐ Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month. WJMC’s Dr. James McKinnie, a board‐certified electrophysiologist, will host a free talk for the public on the condition:  

Monday, September 23 at Noon:  West Jefferson Care Transition Clinic Classroom 4500 10th Street, Marrero, LA 70072

About Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial Fibrillation (also known as AFib or AF) is the most common arrhythmia and many people don’t know they have it. It affects more than 2.5 million people in the U.S. and accounts for approximately one‐third of hospitalizations for cardiac rhythm disturbances. AFib is a serious but treatable condition.

It is characterized by a rapid and irregular heartbeat caused when the top chambers of the heart (the atria) quiver (fibrillate) erratically, sometimes faster than 200 times per minute. The condition can have a significant negative impact on an individual's quality of life, causing heart palpitations, chronic fatigue, and debilitating pain.

“According to the American Stroke Association, AFib is a major risk factor for stroke making a person five times more likely to have a stroke,” said Christy Kareokowsky, Director of West Jefferson Cardiac Service Line. “The information presented during the September 23 talk, could save your life or the life of your loved one.”

AFib is estimated to be responsible for 88,000 deaths and $16‐billion in additional costs to the U.S. healthcare system. As the world population ages, the prevalence of AFib is projected to increase. In fact, in the next 30‐40 years, the number of people diagnosed with AFib in the U.S. is expected to more than double.

West Jefferson, through its efforts during Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month and throughout the year, is working to increase public knowledge of AFib, including its symptoms, warning signs, and available treatment options. Join us for Dr. McKinnie’s talk.  Groups are welcomed. Reservations are suggested.   Call (504) 349‐6163.