Quality

Colonoscopy Follow-up

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for colorectal cancer beginning at age 50. A colonoscopy is one test doctors can use to find precancerous polyps (abnormal growths) or colorectal cancer. During a colonoscopy, your doctor can remove any polyps that are found.

Individuals between the ages of 50 and 75 who are not at high risk should have a screening colonoscopy every 10 years. Regular screening colonoscopies are not recommended for most people over 75 years of age, because the benefits of having colonoscopies are small compared to the potential increase in risks. Talk to your doctor about other types of cancer screening tests that may be right for you.

West Jefferson Medical Center recognizes the importance of follow-up colorectal screening and provides our patients with this important information upon completion of your exam.

https://www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare/about/timely-effective-care.html

Percentage of patients receiving appropriate recommendation for follow-up screening colonoscopy

Note: This data is publicly reported on Hospital Compare at https://www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare Data as of 7/22/20

Percentage of patients with history of polyps receiving follow-up colonoscopy in the appropriate timeframe

Note: This data is publicly reported on Hospital Compare at https://www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare. Data as of 7/22/2020

Pregnancy and Delivery Care

Guidelines developed by doctors and researchers say it is best to wait until the 39th completed week of pregnancy to deliver your baby because important fetal development takes place in your baby’s brain and lungs during the last few weeks of pregnancy.

Sometimes women go into early labor on their own, and early deliveries cannot be prevented. Sometimes, doctors decide that inducing labor or delivering a baby early by C-section (called “elective delivery”) is in the best interest of the mother and the baby. In these cases, early deliveries are medically necessary.

West Jefferson Medical Center is dedicated to keeping our mothers and babies safe by avoiding early elective deliveries when they are not medically necessary.

By providing care to pregnant women that follows best practices, hospitals and doctors can improve chances for a safe delivery and a healthy baby.

https://www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare/about/timely-effective-care.html

Percentage of mothers whose deliveries were scheduled too early (1-2 weeks early), when a scheduled delivery was not medically necessary

Note: This data is publicly reported on Hospital Compare at https://www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare Data as of 7/22/20

Use of Medical Imaging

“Medical imaging” tests create images of various parts of the body to screen for or diagnose medical conditions. Examples of medical imaging include CT scans, MRIs, and mammograms.

These outpatient imaging efficiency measures give you information about hospitals’ use of medical imaging tests for outpatients.

At West Jefferson Medical Center, keeping our patients safe and free from harm is our number one priority. We strive to reduce the risk of unnecessary testing and radiation exposure in our patients.

Outpatients with low-back pain who had an MRI without trying recommended treatments (such as physical therapy) first (if a number is high, it may mean the facility is doing too many unnecessary MRIs for low-back pain)

Note: This data is publicly reported on Hospital Compare at https://www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare. Data as of 7/22/20

Percentage of outpatients who got cardiac imaging stress tests before low-risk outpatient surgery (If a number is high, it may mean that too many cardiac scans were done prior to low-risk surgeries.)

Note: This data is publicly reported on Hospital Compare at https://www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare Data as of 7/22/20